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The Silent Victims of a Forgotten War

Paula Bronstein | Afghanistan

Organization: self employed at Paula Bronstein Photography

KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -MARCH 29, 2016: A the Emergency hospital Najiba holds her nephew Shabir, age 2, who was injured from a bomb blast which killed his sister in Kabul on March 29, 2016. Najiba had to stay with the children as their mother buried her daughter.
Afghan civilians are at greater risk today than at any time since Taliban rule. According to UN statistics, in the first half of 2016 at least 1,600 people had died, and more than 3,500 people were injured, a 4 per cent increase in overall civilian causalities compared to the same period last year. The upsurge in violence has had devastating consequences for civilians, with suicide bombings and targeted attacks by the Taliban and other insurgents causing 70 percent of all civilian casualties.


Afghan civilians are at greater risk today than at any time since Taliban rule. According to UN statistics, in the first half of 2016 at least 1,600 people had died, and more than 3,500 people were injured, a 4 per cent increase in overall civilian causalities compared to the same period last year. The upsurge in violence has had devastating consequences for civilians, with suicide bombings and targeted attacks by the Taliban and other insurgents causing 70 percent of all civilian casualties.

Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting

“ The Silent Victims of a Forgotten War”

Afghanistan has endured armed conflict to one degree or another since 1979, when the Soviet Union invaded.2016 marked another milestone in its 15-year engagement in Afghanistan. Today security for the Afghan people has also deteriorated in large swaths of the country. Afghan civilians are at greater risk today than at any time since Taliban rule. According to UN statistics, in the first half of 2016 at least 1,600 people had died, and more than 3,500 people were injured. The upsurge in violence has had devastating consequences for civilians, with suicide bombings and targeted attacks by the Taliban causing 70 percent of all civilian casualties.The war torn country is one of the most mined countries in the world,littered with unexploded ordinance (UXO)which continues to injure, kill and destroy creatinga large disabled population.While no reliable statistics exist for people with disabilities in Afghanistan, estimates range from 6% up to 10% of the population of around 30 million. Despite billions of dollars spent by the international community to stabilize the country, Afghanistan has seen little improvement in terms of overall stability and human security. The situation on the ground for Afghans continues to be grave.

Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting - grantee

PAULA BRONSTEIN | PHOTOJOURNALIST

www.paulaphoto.com

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