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Life in Za’atari, the largest Syrian refugee camp in the world.

Richard Juilliart | Jordan

Located in northern Jordan, Za’atari refugee camp hosts around 80,000 Syrians who have been forced to flee the war in Syria. More than half of these refugees are children. Since 2012 the camp, divided into 12 districts, has grown from a collection of tents to a semi-permanent city. At its peak, it housed around 150,000 Syrian refugees, becoming the fourth-largest city in Jordan.
For the refugees it is the nearest thing to home, but many are still struggling to find work, surviving on limited aid or working illegally. Less than a fifth of them have current work permits. Women in particular are excluded from employment opportunities as they battle with social norms that dictate that they stay close to home.

© Richard Juilliart

Located in northern Jordan, Za’atari refugee camp hosts around 80,000 Syrians who have been forced to flee the war in Syria. More than half of these refugees are children. Since 2012 the camp, divided into 12 districts, has grown from a collection of tents to a semi-permanent city. At its peak, it housed around 150,000 Syrian refugees, becoming the fourth-largest city in Jordan.

For the refugees it is the nearest thing to home, but many are still struggling to find work, surviving on limited aid or working illegally.Less than a fifth of them have current work permits. Women in particular are excluded from employment opportunities as they battle with social norms that dictate that they stay close to home.

Located in northern Jordan, Za’atari refugee camp hosts around 80,000 Syrians who have been forced to flee the war in Syria. More than half of these refugees are children. Since 2012 the camp, divided into 12 districts, has grown from a collection of tents to a semi-permanent city. At its peak, it housed around 150,000 Syrian refugees, becoming the fourth-largest city in Jordan.

For the refugees it is the nearest thing to home, but many are still struggling to find work, surviving on limited aid or working illegally.Less than a fifth of them have current work permits. Women in particular are excluded from employment opportunities as they battle with social norms that dictate that they stay close to home.

www.richardjuilliart.com

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